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Posts Tagged ‘ Google ’

Gmail’s Basic HTML Warning

By on June 8, 2015

If you use this URL to open Gmail’s basic HTML interface, you’ll probably see this message:

“Do you really want to use HTML Gmail? You’re about to use a version of Gmail designed for slower connections and legacy browsers. To get all of Gmail’s features, including inbox categories, images, and quick actions, please use the latest version of Gmail (recommended).”

You can click “Take me to latest Gmail” or “I’d like to use HTML Gmail” if you really, really want to use it.

Google's Project Loon proposes internet distributed by hot air balloon

No, we’re not joking. Google is seriously proposing hot air ballon-powered internet access, and has already launched a pilot project in New Zealand with 50 testers trying to connect via a helium-filled, solar powered balloon. One of the Google[X] moonshot projects, there are a couple of videos embedded after the break explaining the issue, and the technology Google wants to use to address it. Project Loon’s playful logo reflects the custom designed antennas users will use to receive their signal from balloons floating twice as high as commercial airplanes fly. The signal goes from ground based antennas, up to the balloon, which use their high-altitude placement to broadcast much further than other methods. In the future, the company envisions cell phone users connecting to the balloons to extend service where none exists today.

According to Google, in “more than half” of the countries in the southern hemisphere and for two out of three people on earth, internet access is far too expensive. It’s trying to set up pilot projects in other countries on the same latitude as New Zealand, so interested 40th parallel south residents should forward this info to the appropriate officials immediately. Meanwhile, curious Kiwis can sign up to take part in the project on its website, or attend the Festival of Flight in Christchurch on Sunday to meet the team and learn more about it.

Update: Check out another video of the launch of the first balloons embedded after the break, shot via Google Glass by Trey Ratcliff and see even more photos on his site Stuck in Customs.

 




Want To Find Your Phone? Just Google It

I lose my phone in more stupid places than I can possibly count. I seriously considered installing a landline so that I can call my phone the three times per day it goes missing. But Google just made something even better. Type three magic words into search, and you’ll find your missing handset.

Type “find my phone” into Google, and provided you’re logged into your browser with the same Google account as your phone, you’ll instantly get a map of its location, along with the option to ring it.

To get at more serious settings — like the option to wipe your phone, before anyone can Facebook those nudes — you’ll still need Android Device Manager installed. But if you’ve lost your phone down the back of the couch (or had a particularly immemorable night out), a Google browser is all you need from now on.

Google Alerts are email updates of the latest relevant Google results (web, news, etc.) based on your queries. It actually help you to monitoring the web for interesting new content that you request.

The tools a actually available for long time but may forgotten by most of us. Because of the content on the Internet is so much and we are too busy to reading or searching for new content that we are interested everyday, so an auto alert sent to our email is a best way to keep us update.

For example, you want to follow a celebrity news on the Web no matter on blog, news, or any other website, than you just create an alert regarding the celebrity name. If you want to follow every content regarding the Fifa world cup 2014, than you just create another alert regarding that, Google will send the alert and summary to your email once the search engine found any new content. 

Some of the major usage for Google Alert are:

  • find out what is being said about their company or product.
  • monitor a developing news story.
  • keep up to date on a competitor or industry.
  • get the latest news on a celebrity or sports team.
  • find out what’s being said about themselves.

Alerts are pretty easy to set up, but in case you need a little help understanding the various options, take a look at this step-by-step guide.

  1. Go to Google alert website at http://www.google.com/alerts
  2. Enter your search query. This would be exactly what you’d type into a Google Search box. And you can use the same search operators, too. So, for example, if you want to get an alert on the Fifa World Cup 2014, than just enter the keyword “Fifa world cup 2014”
  3. Decide how often you want to receive this particular alert. Google can send you notifications once per day or once per week, but if you’re tracking a particularly important topic, you can choose “As-it-happens.” Be warned that this can result in a flood of e-mails. Fortunately, you can easily edit an Alert to reduce the frequency.
  4. Choose between “all results” and “only the best results,” the latter giving you what Google thinks are the best matches to your query (kind of an expanded “I Feel Lucky”). Again, if one setting isn’t providing the kind of results you want, you can easily toggle to the other.
  5. By default, Alerts will arrive via e-mail, but if you use an RSS reader, you can also choose Feed, then copy that feed to your reader.
  6. With all your choices made, click Create Alert. You’ll immediately land at your Alert-management page, where you can edit or delete alerts as needed.
Setup google alert

Create Google Alert with very simple few step

 

Manage Google alert

Managing your Google alert

Free timer from Google Timers

By on February 18, 2014

The desktop Google Search has a cool feature: search for [timer for 5 minutes] and you’ll see this interactive timer box. You can stop the timer, reset it and Google even has a notification sound you can disable.

Here are some examples of searches you can use: [set timer for 30 seconds], [set timer for 10 minutes and 10 seconds], [set timer for an hour and a half], [timer for 30 seconds], [timer 30 seconds], [timer 30 sec], [timer 23 hours 59 min 59 sec]. If you search for [set timer] or [timer], Google defaults to 5 minutes.

google-timer

Google timer for 4 minutes


google-timer-full-screen

Google Timer in Full screen mood

Video for Google Timer

 

 

To distributing the Andriod application via the IIS 7+, you need to create the custom MIME type map for it, than only your IIS can recognize and know how to handle the file with .apk extension.

To doing that is very simple only:

  1. Upload the .apk file to your webserver
  2. Open the web site that the .apk file located
  3. Click on MIME type
  4. Click on Add
  5. Enter .apk in the file name extension text box
  6. Enter application/octet-Stream in the MIME Type text box
  7. Click OK
  8. Done
Mime Type in IIS website

Click on the MIME type in IIS features view to add the file extension of .apk

 

Add MIME type

Just simply enter the .apk into the file name extension text box and application/octet-Stream into the MIME type text box

 

$6.30 a special number for Google

By on January 10, 2014

andriod-004

Plenty of numbers are important to Google, a company that grew to dominate the Internet by creating search and advertising algorithms that its competitors simply couldn’t find a way to compete with. But today, there is one number in particular that is more important to Google than any other: $6.30. That dollar amount is what Google earns on average per year for each and every Internet user, excluding China. As MongoDB executive Matt Asay explains in a post on TechRepublic, that number shows exactly why Android is so critical to the future of Google’s business.

There are currently 2.5 billion Internet users around the world and that figure is set to increase at an explosive rate. But it’s not PCs that will connect people to the Internet in many emerging markets, it’s low-cost smartphones powered by operating systems like Android. With approximately 7.14 billion people on the planet, that’s a lot of untapped revenue for Google.

$6.30 might not seem like much, especially for a full year. But it adds up very quickly and could translate into billions of dollars — or tens of billions of dollars — for Google each year as more and more people gain access to the company’s services, thus exposing them to its various advertising products.

Bump shutdown annoucementDavid Lieb, CEO and cofounder for Bump technologies (The company was acquired by Google back in September 2013) announced in the official Bump blog that they will officially discontinue the 2 main product which is Bump and Flock on Jan 31 2014. As mention by David Lieb, the application will be removed from Apple App Store and also Google Play, after this date, both app will work and user data will be deleted from their server as well.

We are now deeply focused on our new projects within Google, and we’ve decided to discontinue Bump and Flock. On January 31, 2014, Bump and Flock will be removed from the App Store and Google Play. After this date, neither app will work, and all user data will be deleted.

Bump is an application for iOS and Android devices that let users share data such as contacts and photos simply by bumping their devices together, while Flock is a photo service that creates a single album with photos from multiple devices.

bump discontinue

Happy new year 2014

By on January 1, 2014

Google 2014 Happy new year 2014 to all friend and reader here, wish all the best in the year 2014. At the same time, Google release the latest Google Zeitgeist which show all the search trend around the wold. You may also discover what the world searched for with Google’s year in review.

The following is Google Zeitgeist for the Year 2013.

The following are some of the top search during the year for 2013 in Google Search Engine:

Click here for more top world search trend

 

According to the Wall Street Google_WimmJournal, Google is preparing to start mass production of its smartwatch. It’s probably no surprise to some as Google acquired the smartwatch maker, WIMM Labs, two months ago. Supposedly already in the last few stages of development, the smartwatch will run on Android with a heavy emphasis on Google Now.

 

It appears Google is aiming to address the usefulness of smartwatches with its own smartwatch. The product category has yet to take off due to the current crop of smartwatches’ limited uses despite many different models being present on the market right now. The Google smartwatch is rumored to be able to communicate with a smartphone, and draw information such as schedules from a user’s email through Google Now in order to enhance its usefulness.

 

Google is also looking to reduce its smartwatch’s power consumption so as to extend its battery life, which is another weakness of the current generation of smartwatches.